RAISING HELL SHOWING IN NEW YORK

So… my film is showing at a real cinema in Harlem, New York, what’s more it is showing at the prestigious Maysles Cinema – can you even imagine – below are all the details – please spread the word…. there is a popcorn machine too!

Saturday 21st August 2010 3pm-5pm

COLAGE New York presents: Raising Hell

A film by, for and about the children of lesbian and gay parents.

Dir. Ed Webb-Ingall 2010

30 mins, followed by panel discussion with the film maker and members of COLAGE

This half hour documentary tells the often ignored and unknown story of the children of Lesbian and Gay parents from a personal and political viewpoint. Set alongside an examination of the rich social and political history of Lesbian and Gay parents from the late 1960s to the present day, the film combines found footage and history with on-camera interviews with the children of lesbian and gay parents in the UK aged 12 to 35. This film was made with kids at the heart. The filmmaker was keen to create a safe space where kids can be seen to be speaking freely and openly about their experiences without having to be poster kids for “perfect families.” Instead of perpetuating the myth of the perfect family, or the perfect childhood, this film shows kids who, whatever they felt about their families, didn’t want to change or hide them, but be proud of who and what they have made them.

Through researching, developing and screening this film Ed Webb-Ingall hopes at once to normalise and elaborate on the experiences of the children of lesbian and gay parents.

COLAGE is a national movement of children, youth, and adults with one or more lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) parent/s. We build community and work toward social justice through youth empowerment, leadership development, education, and advocacy.

http://www.raisinghellfilm.wordpress.com

http://www.colage.org/newyork

http://www.mayslesinstitute.org/cinema

343 Malcolm X Blvd / Lenox Ave (Between 127th and 128th Streets) nearest subway 125th on the 2 and 3, just 2 blocks away
contact us: cinema@mayslesinstitute.org

Donations taken on the door – no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

21st August 3-5pm

Stonewall publishes groundbreaking research examining the experiences of children with gay parents.

Stonewall today publishes groundbreaking research examining the experiences of children with gay parents. ‘Different Families’ is based on interviews conducted by the University of Cambridge with over 80 children and young people from the age of four, all of whom have lesbian and gay parents. The research also provides shocking insights into the prevalence of homophobia in Britain’s schools, including primary schools. The children who experience this, although not gay themselves, identify that many schools still don’t address it.

‘We still do things together, and we’re still a big family and we’re still happy … and we still care for each other and we’re still there when someone needs someone.’ Jasmin, 8

‘I just feel there’s some difference between the other families and us. The way we all work together … We all link up like a puzzle.’ Eleanor, 8

Ben Summerskill, Stonewall Chief Executive said; ‘For the children of lesbian and gay parents their families look remarkably like everyone else’s. This research highlights how it’s the prejudices of others which often causes them far more distress than their own personal or family characteristics – and is further evidence of the urgent need to tackle homophobia in our schools.’

Among the report’s recommendations, some of which were made by the children interviewed, are for schools to respond robustly to homophobic language and bullying. YouGov polling commissioned last year by Stonewall showed that anti-gay bullying is almost endemic in Britain’s schools. Nine in ten secondary schools teachers reported that children – regardless of their sexual orientation – currently experience homophobic bullying in their schools. This affects children of gay parents too:

‘Sometimes they say … everybody’s got a dad, he must be dead, or something. I say no, he’s not dead, I’ve got a donor dad … sometimes I get teased by them calling my dad a donut dad … They say … I know what gay means, it’s two naked men dancing around on a boat.’ Mark, 8

‘In school I don’t like it how people make fun of gay people. Like when they say “that’s so gay”. Most people say it as a joke, and it’s not funny at all.’ Maheen, 13

‘She said, ‘well your mum’s gay, so why aren’t you?’ … and then it turned to really nasty comments about my mum. Oh your mum’s an effing dyke and all this stuff and I just thought that’s not on … I just ignored it, but it just got worse.’ Meg, 16

‘Normally people just say like … “gay dad” … and stuff like that. Normally I try and say something back because it like makes me feel better. Or I just try and ignore it. That’s harder obviously … The teachers tell them off but … secretly they always carry on.’ William, 15

source and to download the paper: http://www.stonewall.org.uk/media/current_releases/3966.asp

Children of lesbian couples ‘have fewer behaviour problems’

A 17-year study into families headed by lesbian parents has found that their children have fewer behavioural problems, get better results and are more psychologically sound than children brought up by straight parents.

Researchers at the University of California followed 78 children born to lesbian mothers from birth to the age of 17.

They also found the children were less likely than those with straight parents to behave aggressively or break rules.

The mothers were asked to rate their children on their behaviour, aggression and school marks, while the teenagers were rated with the Child Behavior Checklist, a standardised assessment. Each teenager also filled out an internet-based psychological questionnaire.

Study leader Nanette Gartrell said: “Contrary to assertions from people opposed to same-sex parenting, we found that the 17-year-olds scored higher in psychological adjustment in areas of competency and lower in problem behaviours than the normative age-matched sample of kids raised in traditional families with a mum and a dad.”

“These are not accidental children,” she told WebMD Health News. “The mums tended to be older and attended parenting classes. They were very involved in the process of education [for their children].”

“They anticipated their kids would experience stigmatisation.”

The study did find that children who experienced homophobia had higher levels of depression and anxiety.

Knowing their biological father made no impact on children’s happiness and behaviour.

A number of previous studies have found that children of gay and lesbian parents are as happy, or happier, than their peers brought up by straight parents.

Last year, a study of 1,384 couples, 155 of whom were gay, found that as parents, their sexuality made “no significant difference” on the levels of emotional problems experienced by their children.

The Adoption and Children Act, which came into force in December 2005, gave gay couples and unmarried straight couples the right to jointly adopt children.

Lesbians undergoing IVF treatment can now record their partner as the second parent on the birth certificate.

source:
http://www.pinknews.co.uk/2010/06/08/children-of-lesbian-couples-have-fewer-behaviour-problems/#

Mom’s Apple Pie: The Heart of the Lesbian Mothers’ Custody Movement

I am really keen to see this film and perhaps work out a way to screen it with my film, it sounds great and really insightful

While the beginnings of the LGBT Civil Rights movement was gaining momentum, the 1970s witnessed horrific custody battles for lesbian mothers. Mom’s Apple Pie: The Heart of the Lesbian Mothers’ Custody Movement revisits the early tumultuous years of the lesbian custody movement through the stories of five lesbian mothers and their four children.

Narrated by Kate Clinton, the documentary interviews the sons and daughters who were separated from their mothers, the mothers themselves, and one woman who made the difficult decision to flee with her children. Founders of the Lesbian Rights Project (now the National Center for Lesbian Rights) and the Lesbian Mothers’ National Defense Fund recount the founding of their organizations in response to the bevy of court rulings granting custody to grandparents, fathers and distant relatives based on the belief that lesbians would be unfit parents. Rich with archival photos from JEB (Joan E. Biren) and Cathy Cade, the documentary also features music from iconic lesbian musicians Margie Adam, Alix Dobkin, Mary Watkins and Cris Williamson.

Since the trailer went live…

hi,

this has been a crazy week for me, finished the film, had it shown at the BFI, the cinema of my dreams, had phone calls and talks about screenings and now, having just checked, i have had 858 plays of my trailer in 3 days! so exciting and I was posted on

Mombian » Blog Archive » Raising Hell: The Children of Lesbian and

By Dana
Now comes word of Raising Hell, a half-hour documentary by Ed Webb-Ingall that profiles the experiences of the young adult and adult children of lesbian and gay parents in the U.K., starting back in the late 1960’s.
Mombian – http://www.mombian.com/

which was really sweet, I am hoping to have more blog posts and news of screenings soon, so watch this space and please do repsost my trailer wherever you can…


Teaser Trailer for Raising Hell

So here it is, the teaser trailer i made for my film about the children of lesbian and gay parents – I am excited to hear what you think, do let me know if you can think of anywhere or anyone who might like to do a screening, spread the word…

Raising Hell Teaser Trailer 2 from ed webb-ingall on Vimeo. better quality or else on youtube below:

synopsis

i was asked to write a synopsis for my film for its first up coming screening – I cant wait for y’all to see it!
watch this space for trailer:

This half hour documentary profiles the experiences of the children of Lesbian and Gay parents in the UK aged 12 to 35, exploring themes of School, Gender, Sexuality, Prejudice and what the word Family means. Set alongside an examination of the rich history of Lesbian and Gay parents from the late 1960s to the present day this film at once normalises and elaborates on the unshared and unheard experiences of the children of Lesbian and Gay parents